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End of the solo newsletter dream? — The Media Roundup

A good newsletter exit strategy is hard to find

Delia Cai takes a look at the considerations that go into giving up your newsletter, from the calculation of time/cost to the need to then refund subscribers for the unused portion of the spend.

The most important thing to take away, however, is that no matter how Substack might like to present it, a paid-for newsletter is not the oven-ready career it might appear to be:

“When I asked Quah if full-time employment had reduced the sense of burnout, he allowed that it did feel more liberating to be on a team, though it brought its own kind of pressure. ‘Now it’s like, Am I a good enough writer? Am I matching up to my peers and colleagues? That’s a different kind of anxiety.’ The ride, it seems, never really stops.”

‘We’re not a zeitgeist, viral, follow me platform’: Reddit COO on non-English expansion

I’ve never spoken to a social media manager at a publisher who has had a clear and consistent strategy for Reddit. Sometimes your article hits its front page and sees a huge surge in traffic, mostly it doesn’t. I interviewed its COO Jen Wong about why that might be.

How specialist publishers are adapting

We talk a lot about general news publishers on the podcast. They’re the most visible and often most influential publications out there – but there are numerically far more specialist and smaller publications out there. So how are they adapting, and how far through their digital transformation are they?

RTHK’s swift turn from maverick voice to official mouthpiece

RTHK has often set the news agenda with its aggressive coverage of Hong Kong. But a Beijing clampdown has changed that, with pro-China coverage filling the void. It’s a timely and chilling reminder that censorship is alive and well in other parts of the world.


This content originally appeared in The Media Roundup, a daily newsletter from Media Voices. Subscribe here: