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How Skift survived COVID: The Media Roundup

How Skift survived COVID

This is your chance to listen to two of the smartest people in media on one podcast: Brian Morrissey interviewing Skift’s Rafat Ali for The Rebooting podcast. On Skift’s 10th anniversary, Rafat talks about how his travel media business weathered the COVID storm and how some tough decisions have made the business stronger.

Skift is more profitable now than it’s ever been, with more employees now than it had pre-pandemic. Rafat explains how COVID expanded the talent pool, with Skift becoming a permanently distributed company. Of the 20 people brought on recently, only one has been based in New York City.

Skift’s advertising client base also shifted as a result of the pandemic. With most travel vendors mothballed for much of the pandemic, Skift pivoted to an alternative revenue base in cash-rich tech companies keen to reach the travel industry ready for when things started to open up again. Altogether, a great discussion on surviving and thriving through tough times.

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